News - Auto News

Whistleblower law doesn't apply to fired GM worker

A fired GM assembly plant repairman who told management about concerns with the facility's inspection process isn't protected by a federal whistleblower law because his report didn't relate to defects in the vehicles, a judge in Missouri has ruled.

Thank you, Sting, for Oshawa efforts

TO THE EDITOR:

Way to go, Sting. This musical could not have come to Toronto at a better time ("Unifor gets musician Sting to join fight for GM's Oshawa plant," autonews.com, Feb. 11). I just came back from seeing The Last Ship, and it hit home for me. I worked at General Motors' transmission plant in Windsor for 30 years. We felt gutted when our plant closed in 2010. The sad part is, the plant could have stayed open and created many more jobs for many years to come.

I hope Sting can help the Oshawa plant stay open. His going there certainly creates some publicity. The only reason this plant is ending production is because of corporate greed. It's a shame profits mean more to GM than the lives of a community. We know in Windsor how it feels.

Maybe if everyone boycotted GM and they saw their profits drop, that would open their eyes. Being a huge Sting fan, I wish I could thank him. If GM does close and go to Mexico? It will be time to buy a Toyota. At least they build cars here.

JIM CAMPBELL ,Windsor, Ontario

Spinoff to build smart suspension systems

Driv, a newly christened combination of Tenneco and Federal-Mogul businesses, will seek to engage automaker customers with intelligent suspension systems.

Jaguar jitters

The British magazine Autocar reports Jaguar is considering a foray into the EV world with a vehicle possibly combining its XE and EF models.

Mediation ordered for Ford Credit, Texas group

Citing consumers affected by the Texas dealership group as a concern, Judge Robert Jones has ordered Ford Credit into mediation with Reagor Dykes.